Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Creating a Water Garden: Do's and Don't's August 9


The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group will present the Program "Creating a Water Garden: Do's and Don't's" which will be presented by Cindy Meredith on Wednesday, August 9 at 10:00 at the old Rockport School 106 Live Oak room 14. 

https://www.facebook.com/theherbcottage/



Click on the following link to see Cindy's Water Garden:

https://scontent-dft4-2.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t31.0-8/20617034_10212210100985420_7326519345990799794_o.jpg?oh=a0e40a24974cc6e816faaea1e70c8a17&oe=5A003E63&dl=1

Friday, July 14, 2017

I was sent this article from BioClarity on herbs you can grow that are good for skin care. It's a nice article, well written and informative. Some of the herbs will even grow in Rockport! I'm including a sample from the article as well as the link.


Cilantro

Next time you’re chopping up cilantro for your favorite guacamole or salsa recipe, consider the benefits this herb offers for your skin. Eating cilantro provides plenty of health benefits, including decreased cholesterol and digestive issue relief, but it can also pack a powerful punch when it comes to skin care. Cilantro is jam-packed with antioxidants that fight free radicals, and provides a potent dose of Vitamin C. Cilantro has antibacterial and antifungal properties, and can help soothe inflammation for those with acne-prone skin.
Ingestible Benefits: Throw cilantro into your favorite salad or dish to soothe your digestive system and decrease high cholesterol levels.
Topical Benefits: Grind coriander seeds and mix the powder into your favorite DIY mask to take advantage of its soothing, anti-inflammatory benefits.
Growing Tips: This aromatic herb does best in sunny or lightly shaded areas in southern zones. Make sure your soil is moist and well-draining. As you begin to plant, be sure to leave around seven inches between each seed; if you want to maintain your fresh cilantro, sow them every two to three weeks.

Bay Leaf

Bay leaves can help detoxify the body, minimize the effects of aging on your skin, combat bacterial infections, reduce inflammation, and speed up healing. This wonder leaf deserves a spot of honor in your botanical skin care solutions. True bay leafs come from the Laurel tree and can be ground into a fine powder for use in home skin care remedies.
Ingestible Benefits: Toss a few bay leaves into your favorite soup or stew and take advantage of its ability to soothe an upset stomach, facilitate efficient digestion, boost heart health, and regulate blood sugar levels.
Topical Benefits: Grind up a few bay leaves and apply topically with your favorite moisturizer. Bay leaves contain unique phytonutrients that can reduce irritation and alleviate joint pain when applied topically. Apply bay leaves topically to blemishes and skin lesions to encourage healing and get smooth radiant skin.
Growing Tips: You can actually grow bay laurel in a pot, just be sure it gets enough sunlight and is planted in a well-draining container. Be sure to water your laurel deeply, less frequently—the soil should dry out a little bit in between waterings.

Cucumbers

Fresh cucumbers contain plenty of antioxidants, helping you combat wrinkles and prevent sun damage. Cucumbers contain important compounds called cucumerin and cucurbitacins that can help fight inflammation and minimize the effects of aging. They also pack a mean punch of Vitamins C and K, antioxidants that can help fight dark circles under your eyes. The Vitamin B5 found in this crunchy produce helps the skin retain moisture, while silica found in cucumbers promotes collagen production, which can help combat wrinkles.
Ingestible Benefits: Chop up cucumbers in your favorite salad and munch on this crunchy fruit to take advantage of numerous benefits. Eating cucumbers can relieve heartburn, flush out toxins, and nourish your body with plenty of immunity boosting Vitamins, including A, B, and C.
Topical Benefits: Head to any local spa and you’ll find a cucumber-based treatment. Make your own resort spa experience at home by using cucumber juice in your favorite DIY masks. Throw a cucumber in a processor and mix with some lemon juice and sugar for an at-home scrub.
Growing Tips: Cucumbers are easy to grow, even for novice gardeners. Plant your cucumbers in an area that receives full sun, keep the soil moist, and voila—you’ll have the perfect addition to a summer salad and your next at-home skin care treatment. Cucumbers require steady watering, and using compost and nutrient-rich fertilizer will help yield some delicious produce.

Enjoy!

Saturday, June 3, 2017

NO JUNE AND JULY PROGRAMS


This is to let all of you "herbies" out there know that the Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group takes the months of June and July off!  It's too hot and too many of us travel during these months!  So see you in September! 



Sunday, May 21, 2017

Potager Gardening


I found this interesting article this morning about potager gardens. Check it out.

"A potager garden literally translates 'for the soup pot'. Vegetables, fruits, and both medicinal and edible herbs are grown together with the main incentive to feed the family. These traditional kitchen gardens date back to France nearly a thousand years ago when it was common for people to grow their own food and medicine."

Click on the link to continue reading the article. 

http://www.womenwhofarm.com/potager-gardens-have-been-around-for-centuries-and-continue-the-old-traditions-of-growing/

Sunday, May 7, 2017

May 10 Program



Herb group:  May 10, Wed. 10 am at the History Center, 801 E. Cedar, Maureen Winkelman and Kam Wagert will present a program on “Doc Bruhl’s Herbs” highlighting the herbs found in the flowerbeds of the Center. We will also tour the gardens of the Center.

Friday, April 14, 2017

Herbaria Magazine

I thought I'd share the April Herbaria Magazine. It's a free digital magazine with lots of interesting herb info.

Here's the link

Enjoy.

Monday, March 27, 2017

Medicinal Herbs to Grow in Your Garden

Here's a lovely post about healthy, useful herbs to grow in any garden.

Chestnut School of Herbal Medicine

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

List of Edible Flowers BY MARK MACDONALD


Here is a very good article that was posted on The Herb Society of America.  Be sure to check it out! Also Facebook friends, be sure to "Like" The Herb Society of America's Facebook Site. If you are not a member, please consider joining.  It's a wonderful society with a wealth of herbal information!


List of Edible Flowers


https://www.westcoastseeds.com/garden-resources/articles-instructions/list-edible-flowers/


https://www.facebook.com/The-Herb-Society-of-America-10720845126/?fref=nf


http://www.herbsociety.org

Great Gardening!

Friday, February 17, 2017

March 8 Victoria Field Trip


Hello Herbies! 

On March 8, are taking a field trip to Victoria to visit EarthWorks Nursery and then the Victoria County Master Gardeners demo gardens and then eat at The PumpHouse.

We will meet in the parking lot of the old Ace Hardware store and car pool to Victoria departing at 8:00 am.  

Please RSVP so we will know whom wants to go.  If we do not hear from you, we will assume that you will not go with us.

Hope to see everyone there!

Linda T. Collins
361-729-6037 land line
713-582-2268
http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com

Keep up with our Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group blog.  We always have lots of good information on it.

Mission Statement

The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, is a non-profit educational organization dedicated to increasing public knowledge and awareness about herbs and roses.

Come and learn everything you ever wanted to know about herbs. Do you know that there are over 2,000 herbs and that roses are herbs too? Do you know that many of our Texas Native Plants are also herbs? Herbs are used not only for culinary purposes, but also for medicinal, cosmetic and craft purposes.

We meet the second Wednesday of every month at the ACISD Maintenance Department Formerly Rockport Elementary, 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, Texas at 10:00 a.m. to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs including the historical uses of the herbs and tips for successful propagation and cultivation.

We are open to the public. Some members of the group are available as speakers to other audiences

Thursday, February 2, 2017

February 8, 2017 programs is "The Buzz About Bees"


Hello Herbies!

Last week we had a great program presented by Pat Baugh and Mimi Baugh.  Unfortunately it's not looking good for the bees.  🐝🐝🐝🐝🐝🐝🐝

http://www.nbcnews.com/science/environment/trump-administation-delays-listing-rusty-patched-bumble-bee-endangered-species-n719321/?cid=sm_npd_nn_fb_ma

Our upcoming program February 8, 2017 at 10:00 is:

"The Buzz About Bees"

Presented by Mimi Baugh

Location:
619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14
Rockport, TX 78383

Hope to see everyone there!

Linda T. Collins
361-729-6037 land line
713-582-2268
http://rockportherbies.blogspot.com

Mission Statement

The Rockport Herb & Rose Study Group, founded in March 2003, is a non-profit educational organization dedicated to increasing public knowledge and awareness about herbs and roses.

Come and learn everything you ever wanted to know about herbs. Do you know that there are over 2,000 herbs and that roses are herbs too? Do you know that many of our Texas Native Plants are also herbs? Herbs are used not only for culinary purposes, but also for medicinal, cosmetic and craft purposes.

We meet the second Wednesday of every month at the ACISD Maintenance Department Formerly Rockport Elementary, 619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14, Rockport, Texas at 10:00 a.m. to discuss all aspects of using and growing herbs including the historical uses of the herbs and tips for successful propagation and cultivation.

We are open to the public. Some members of the group are available as speakers to other audiences.  

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

ROSEMARY


Rosemary is easy to grow.  It's a great culinary too. Check out the following websites for more information.

https://bonnieplants.com/growing/growing-rosemary/

http://www.medievalists.net/2016/01/23-medieval-uses-for-rosemary/

Enjoy!

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

Wait to Prune

This was a post on the Aransas/San Patricio Master Gardeners FB page.

AFTER THE FREEZE—WAIT TO PRUNE - By Ginger Easton Smith, Extension Agent

The recent frigid weather injured countless plants, and killed many others.  Cold temperatures can damage the entire plant, or parts such as leaves, buds, flowers, trunks, stems or roots.

People may be anxious to get outside and prune off the now unattractive parts of plants, but be patient!  It is better to wait until the weather warms up and all chance of a freeze is past for the season.

The exception to this is plants that are not woody and have tissue that has turned mushy.  It can, and should, be removed within a couple of weeks.  This would prevent any pathogens that might have entered through the damaged tissue from moving toward the center of the plant.  Cut off anything that’s mushy and be sure to dip your pruners in rubbing alcohol for 30 seconds between cuts to keep from spreading potential pathogens to other plants or plant parts.

There are several reasons for waiting to prune anything woody; pruning now may stimulate new growth which would be very susceptible to damage if we get some more cold weather, another reason is that it is difficult to tell right now whether branches are dead or have just lost leaves; many may surprise you by pushing out some new shoots.  Often the tip of a branch is killed but the rest is alright.  You wouldn’t want to cut off live branches or twigs.  Also, outer branches, even if they are dead, may provide some wind protection or insulation to inner branches.

There’s no reason to rush anyway as it doesn’t help the plant to prune off dead wood at this point.  When things warm up and new buds form and develop into leaves, it will become obvious where to make pruning cuts to remove dead sections.  Keep in mind that some plants will die back to the ground but will put out new shoots in the spring, so be patient.

The other, unfortunate, side of this is that some damage will be internal and not be visible or cause any problems for several months.  Injury to roots, which have little ability to develop cold tolerance and are particularly susceptible if the plant is growing in a pot, also often won’t show up until a very warm day when the reduced root system just can’t provide enough water to the plant.

Freezing temperatures can also damage the water moving system inside tree trunks, limiting the water that can be moved up the trunk to the leaves. Many broadleaf trees can grow new conducting tissue, but due to their very different structure, palms cannot.  Again, the problem may not be visible until the first hot day when the fronds all wilt severely.

Palm leaf buds deep in the plant may have been damaged by the frigid weather but the signs won’t show up until the bud develops and emerges brown, partially brown or deformed.  Fortunately, the leaves will often grow out of the injury.

Grass that hadn’t turned brown before the storm, is probably brown now.  But don’t worry, most of it will green up nicely when it gets a bit warmer.  Give it a light application of fertilizer in March and water deeply about once a week.

Unfortunately, there will be plants that don’t make it through the freeze.  Look at the bright side. This will give you a chance to try some new plants in your yard.  Watch for the Master Gardeners Spring Plant Sale on March 4 and sales at local nurseries.

Any stress to plants, including freezing temperatures, excessive water, drought, and improper or overly-enthusiastic pruning, weakens plants making them susceptible to diseases and insect infestations that wouldn’t harm a healthy plant.
Any damage, which could include pruning cuts, provides an entry point to pathogens that might not normally bother the plant.

Keep an eye on your plants as the weather warms up, watching for any signs of disease.   If something develops on a few leaves or twigs, you can probably just prune it off.  Be sure to disinfect your clippers after making each cut.

A healthy plant is always best defense against any challenge.  It will be more resistant to damage, and recover from it more easily.  Try to keep your plants supplied with adequate, but not excessive, water and nutrients; and prune as needed.

Sunday, January 8, 2017

Use Those Sour Oranges



I know a lot of us have sour oranges in our yards. Most people don't use them, but actually should us them. They are used a lot in Cuban recipes. I recently made both beef and pork ribs with my son. We marinated the ribs in marinate with the sour oranges, garlic, onions, fresh herbs, salt and pepper. They were very good. Give them a try. Search for sour orange recipes. Here's a recipe using them.

http://hispanickitchen.com/recipes/pierna-asada-al-estilo-cubano/

http://www.thekitchn.com/5-uses-for-sour-orange-juice-119172

Substitute the sour orange juice for the orange juice and the lemon juice in this recipe.  
http://www.foodandwine.com/recipes/sour-orange-yucatan-chickens

http://www.authenticflorida.com/articles/what-to-eat/best-ever-sour-orange-pie/

http://www.cooks.com/rec/search/0,1-0,using_sour_oranges,FF.html






Give the earth time to warm up again.


Important information about gardening and freezing weather. Generally we don't get hard freezes this far south. Lots of tropicals get lost when it gets this cold.  

Thursday, January 5, 2017

January 11, 2017 Program



Hello Herbies, 

Our first program for January 11, 2017 at 10:00 is:

"Warming spices: turmeric, cinnamon, cardamom and the like. History, uses and benefits." 

Presented by Cindy Meredith

Location:
619 N. Live Oak Street, Room 14
Rockport, TX 78383

Hope to see everyone there! 

Linda T. Collins
361-729-6037 land line
713-582-2268